New Museum

Aug 20

Ziad Antar’s photographs probe the production of images, their role as documentation, and their symbolic relationship to time passing within the urban environment. For “Here and Elsewhere,” Antar presents the “Expired” series, which began in 2000 with the artist’s visit to Studio Shehrazade in Saïda, the workshop of renowned Lebanese studio photographer Hashem El Madani (b. 1928). From El Madani, Antar purchased a 1948 Kodak Reflex II camera and ten rolls of medium format, black-and-white film that had expired in 1976. For nearly a decade, Antar experimented with this film in different vintage cameras during his travels to Cairo, Dubai, and Sharjah, producing grainy, painterly reflections of light and shadow.
Ziad Antar, Mecca II, from the “Expired” series, 2005. Gelatin silver print, 19 3/4 x 19 3/4 in (50 x 50 cm). Courtesy the artist and Selma Feriani Gallery, London 

Ziad Antar’s photographs probe the production of images, their role as documentation, and their symbolic relationship to time passing within the urban environment. For “Here and Elsewhere,” Antar presents the “Expired” series, which began in 2000 with the artist’s visit to Studio Shehrazade in Saïda, the workshop of renowned Lebanese studio photographer Hashem El Madani (b. 1928). From El Madani, Antar purchased a 1948 Kodak Reflex II camera and ten rolls of medium format, black-and-white film that had expired in 1976. For nearly a decade, Antar experimented with this film in different vintage cameras during his travels to Cairo, Dubai, and Sharjah, producing grainy, painterly reflections of light and shadow.

Ziad Antar, Mecca II, from the “Expired” series, 2005. Gelatin silver print, 19 3/4 x 19 3/4 in (50 x 50 cm). Courtesy the artist and Selma Feriani Gallery, London 

Aug 19

Suha Traboulsi, Untitled, 1943–49, on view on the Fifth Floor of “Here and Elsewhere.”
The works exhibited are from the 1940s, marking Suha Traboulsi’s first departure from conventional methods of painting to more conceptual portraits illustrated using ink or even ballpoint pen on paper. In these works, brightly colored and oddly offset, fragmented shapes appear as if stenciled and digitally manipulated—in line with the minimalist aesthetic soon to prevail internationally, yet uncannily ahead of their time.
Photos: Benoit Pailley 

Suha Traboulsi, Untitled, 1943–49, on view on the Fifth Floor of “Here and Elsewhere.

The works exhibited are from the 1940s, marking Suha Traboulsi’s first departure from conventional methods of painting to more conceptual portraits illustrated using ink or even ballpoint pen on paper. In these works, brightly colored and oddly offset, fragmented shapes appear as if stenciled and digitally manipulated—in line with the minimalist aesthetic soon to prevail internationally, yet uncannily ahead of their time.

Photos: Benoit Pailley 

Aug 18

New in First Look: New Art Online (now co-presented with Rhizome): "Frances Stark and David Kravitz: Opening the Kimono"
When artist Frances Stark and Snapchat developer David Kravitz discussed the idea of having sex on stage during their presentation at Rhizome’s 2013 Seven on Seven Conference, it wasn’t entirely surprising. During their presentation, neither of their bodies was on view on stage (Kravitz came up alone for the Q&A). Instead, they appeared onscreen via a live iMessage conversation in which they satirize Silicon Valley culture and sext about creative labor.Titled Opening the Kimono (2014), a screen-capture video version of this performance is now presented as part of First Look, an online commissioning program organized by the New Museum and Rhizome.
Click here to read more and view the work.

New in First Look: New Art Online (now co-presented with Rhizome): "Frances Stark and David Kravitz: Opening the Kimono"

When artist Frances Stark and Snapchat developer David Kravitz discussed the idea of having sex on stage during their presentation at Rhizome’s 2013 Seven on Seven Conference, it wasn’t entirely surprising. During their presentation, neither of their bodies was on view on stage (Kravitz came up alone for the Q&A). Instead, they appeared onscreen via a live iMessage conversation in which they satirize Silicon Valley culture and sext about creative labor.Titled Opening the Kimono (2014), a screen-capture video version of this performance is now presented as part of First Look, an online commissioning program organized by the New Museum and Rhizome.

Click here to read more and view the work.

Aug 16

Thank you for the beautiful drawing of our building!

Thank you for the beautiful drawing of our building!

(Source: raphaellescure)

Aug 15

Here And Elsewhere -

nyc-today:

Can you name at least five contemporary Arab visual artists? How about just one? Thankfully, the exhibition over at the New Museum on Bowery is showcasing the works of over forty-five artists who share roots in the Arab world, and is a must see for anyone remotely interested in understanding…

Aug 14

Nearly three decades ago, we presented “Ana Mendieta: A Retrospective” (November 20 1987—January 24 1988) at our previous space at 583 Broadway. Mendieta uses her body as a medium for performances, earth art, body art, and photo art.
“I am overwhelmed by the feeling of having been cast from the womb (nature). My art is the way I re-establish the bonds that unite me to the universe. It is a return to the maternal source.” – Ana Mendieta
Photo: Fred Scrutin

Nearly three decades ago, we presented “Ana Mendieta: A Retrospective” (November 20 1987—January 24 1988) at our previous space at 583 Broadway. Mendieta uses her body as a medium for performances, earth art, body art, and photo art.

“I am overwhelmed by the feeling of having been cast from the womb (nature). My art is the way I re-establish the bonds that unite me to the universe. It is a return to the maternal source.” – Ana Mendieta

Photo: Fred Scrutin

Aug 13

Hassan Sharif’s ongoing series "Objects" began in the early 1980s when Sharif started looking for an alternative to contemporary painting and sculpture. Finding similarities in the deconstruction of everyday scrap materials and the construction of art objects, Sharif coined the idea of “redundant repetition,” and embraced a Zen-like approach to boring serial tasks that, for him, mirror natural and industrial systems of production.
Pictured here is a detail of Aluminum 2 (2005) as part of Sharif’s “Objects” series.
“Here and Elsewhere" is on view through September 28. 

Hassan Sharif’s ongoing series "Objects" began in the early 1980s when Sharif started looking for an alternative to contemporary painting and sculpture. Finding similarities in the deconstruction of everyday scrap materials and the construction of art objects, Sharif coined the idea of “redundant repetition,” and embraced a Zen-like approach to boring serial tasks that, for him, mirror natural and industrial systems of production.

Pictured here is a detail of Aluminum 2 (2005) as part of Sharif’s “Objects” series.

Here and Elsewhere" is on view through September 28. 

Aug 12

Artist Charles Lutz has taken over our Store window for his limited edition ceramic vase, “The Corruptible,” which is cast from an unused 1940’s era bottle that would have been intended for the christening of cruise ships and destroyers. Meant to usher in their existences of either pleasure or destruction, this practice also serves as the inspiration for the artist’s stainless steel sculpture “The Incorruptible”. 
The vase is available for purchase in store or on the New Museum Store’s website.

Artist Charles Lutz has taken over our Store window for his limited edition ceramic vase, “The Corruptible,” which is cast from an unused 1940’s era bottle that would have been intended for the christening of cruise ships and destroyers. Meant to usher in their existences of either pleasure or destruction, this practice also serves as the inspiration for the artist’s stainless steel sculpture “The Incorruptible”. 

The vase is available for purchase in store or on the New Museum Store’s website.

Aug 11

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: New Museum Seminars: (Temporary) Collections of Ideas
In fall 2013, the New Museum’s Department of Education and Public Engagement initiated R&D (Research and Development) Seasons, connecting various projects in the galleries, Theater, and Resource Center around a new organizing theme each fall and spring. The upcoming Fall 2014 Season will be dedicated to CHOREOGRAPHY. It will address the very concept of choreography and, additionally, various ways of “writing the body” will be plumbed to extend choreography’s value both inside and beyond the purview of dance. Potential lines of inquiry include the current role of dance within the art world and attendant questions relative to labor, embodiment, economy, pleasure, affect, and modes of exchange. The role of technology, new modalities of community, as well as structures of discipline and punishment may all be addressed. How does choreography allow new considerations of subjectivity, built as it is by way of negotiations between agency and oppression, complicity and refusal? Read more here. 
Applications for the fall semester are due on Monday, September 8. Please send a CV, a relevant work sample, a statement of interest detailing an overall directional approach to the theme (approx. 500 words), and a proposal for one session’s presentation including 3–4 objects of study (such as texts, artworks, cultural ephemera, and exercises) to: seminars@newmuseum.org. 
Photo: Visitor to the New Museum’s SoHo Center Library, 1989. Photo: Veronica Sadler

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: New Museum Seminars: (Temporary) Collections of Ideas

In fall 2013, the New Museum’s Department of Education and Public Engagement initiated R&D (Research and Development) Seasons, connecting various projects in the galleries, Theater, and Resource Center around a new organizing theme each fall and spring. The upcoming Fall 2014 Season will be dedicated to CHOREOGRAPHYIt will address the very concept of choreography and, additionally, various ways of “writing the body” will be plumbed to extend choreography’s value both inside and beyond the purview of dance. Potential lines of inquiry include the current role of dance within the art world and attendant questions relative to labor, embodiment, economy, pleasure, affect, and modes of exchange. The role of technology, new modalities of community, as well as structures of discipline and punishment may all be addressed. How does choreography allow new considerations of subjectivity, built as it is by way of negotiations between agency and oppression, complicity and refusal? Read more here

Applications for the fall semester are due on Monday, September 8. Please send a CV, a relevant work sample, a statement of interest detailing an overall directional approach to the theme (approx. 500 words), and a proposal for one session’s presentation including 3–4 objects of study (such as texts, artworks, cultural ephemera, and exercises) to: seminars@newmuseum.org. 

Photo: Visitor to the New Museum’s SoHo Center Library, 1989. Photo: Veronica Sadler

Aug 09

Anna Boghiguian’s gnarled drawings and dense watercolor paintings chronicle her ongoing engagement with both ancient civilization and contemporary cities.The two series of drawings exhibited, rich with intensity and energy, examine Egyptian culture in the past and present-day. In one series of works exhibited, Boghiguian ponders the venerated bust of the ancient Egyptian queen Nefertiti, ensconced in Berlin, and in another, she probes Cairo’s collective unconscious while training her eye on the violent confrontations and existential anguish that she witnessed throughout Egyptian society in early 2011.
“Here and Elsewhere" is on view through September 28. We are open Wednesday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Anna Boghiguian’s gnarled drawings and dense watercolor paintings chronicle her ongoing engagement with both ancient civilization and contemporary cities.The two series of drawings exhibited, rich with intensity and energy, examine Egyptian culture in the past and present-day. In one series of works exhibited, Boghiguian ponders the venerated bust of the ancient Egyptian queen Nefertiti, ensconced in Berlin, and in another, she probes Cairo’s collective unconscious while training her eye on the violent confrontations and existential anguish that she witnessed throughout Egyptian society in early 2011.

Here and Elsewhere" is on view through September 28. We are open Wednesday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  These are three of the pile of self-portraits by, and of, the Egyptian photographer known as Van Leo, who shot them in the early 1940s in Cairo. They are now the star attraction at "Here and Elsewhere", the important show of (mostly) contemporary Arab art the New Museum in New York. That’s the subject of the latest Strictly Critical video from me and my pal Christian Viveros-Fauné.  Van Leo’s amazing photos present him playing an ascetic, a pilot, a thug, a starlet and many other roles, and both Christian and I  read them as absurdly early precedents for the persona-shifting self-portraits of Cindy Sherman, made 35 years later.
I don’t suppose that’s wrong, but thinking longer, harder, I realized that they come out of such a different context that our reading needs to change: The series was begun during the utter chaos of the military battles, and political strife, that engulfed Egypt during World War II.  What looks to us like standard postmodern “play” had to feel different then. Van Leo’s self-portraits either betray the most extreme, whistling-by-the-graveyard denial of crisis, or they are an act of firm opposition to the standard, fixed ideals of maleness and culture that got the world into such trouble.
Although it could also be that Van Leo’s context and Sherman’s aren’t actually as different as they look: Being a woman stuck in a patriarchal system may engender just as much of a sense of personal crisis as being a man in time of war. Both Sherman and Van Leo fought back by attacking the foundations of fixed identity. (Courtesy New Museum, New York; photo by Benoit Pailley)
For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  These are three of the pile of self-portraits by, and of, the Egyptian photographer known as Van Leo, who shot them in the early 1940s in Cairo. They are now the star attraction at "Here and Elsewhere", the important show of (mostly) contemporary Arab art the New Museum in New York. That’s the subject of the latest Strictly Critical video from me and my pal Christian Viveros-Fauné.  Van Leo’s amazing photos present him playing an ascetic, a pilot, a thug, a starlet and many other roles, and both Christian and I  read them as absurdly early precedents for the persona-shifting self-portraits of Cindy Sherman, made 35 years later.

I don’t suppose that’s wrong, but thinking longer, harder, I realized that they come out of such a different context that our reading needs to change: The series was begun during the utter chaos of the military battles, and political strife, that engulfed Egypt during World War II.  What looks to us like standard postmodern “play” had to feel different then. Van Leo’s self-portraits either betray the most extreme, whistling-by-the-graveyard denial of crisis, or they are an act of firm opposition to the standard, fixed ideals of maleness and culture that got the world into such trouble.

Although it could also be that Van Leo’s context and Sherman’s aren’t actually as different as they look: Being a woman stuck in a patriarchal system may engender just as much of a sense of personal crisis as being a man in time of war. Both Sherman and Van Leo fought back by attacking the foundations of fixed identity. (Courtesy New Museum, New York; photo by Benoit Pailley)

For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

Aug 08

[video]

Aug 07

Thirteen years ago, the New Museum presented the first career survey of William Kentridge’s work in the United States. The exhibition, titled “William Kentridge,” (June 3–September 16 2001) featured a combination of film, drawing, sculpture, graphics, music, theater, and opera. Much of the artist’s work addresses apartheid, military propaganda, and clashing cultures.
Photo: Collection of Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Thirteen years ago, the New Museum presented the first career survey of William Kentridge’s work in the United States. The exhibition, titled “William Kentridge,” (June 3–September 16 2001) featured a combination of film, drawing, sculpture, graphics, music, theater, and opera. Much of the artist’s work addresses apartheid, military propaganda, and clashing cultures.

Photo: Collection of Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Aug 05

New on the Six Degrees blog: SHOP TALK: Archiving Performance: the Museum’s Methodologies with a canary torsi
As part of the “Shop Talk: Archiving Performance” conversation series, which considers methods for archiving and documenting performance or other live art at the Museum in consultation with artists, Travis Chamberlain, Associate Curator of Performance and Manager of Public Programs, and Tara Hart, Digital Archivist, conducted a two-part conversation with Yanira Castro, a canary torsi Director and Choreographer, and her collaborator, Installation Designer Kathy Couch. “SHOP TALK: Archiving Performance: the Museum’s Methodologies with a canary torsi” marks the second part of this conversation, in which a canary torsi asks Chamberlain and Hart questions concerning the representation of performance’s liveness through documentation at the Museum, paying particular attention to the way in which records of performance are presented online through organizational structures and taxonomic systems. Questions about the Museum’s responsibility to document performance, and how this can impact forms of audience engagement, are addressed in light of recent public programming.
As residents of last fall’s R&D Season “Performance Archiving Performance” (“PAP”), a canary torsi completed the archive of their project “The People to Come: A Participatory Performance Project” (“TPtC”; 2012–13) through a live installation and open studio in the New Museum Theater.
Click here to read the first part of this discussion,  “Terms of Submission with a canary torsi.”

New on the Six Degrees blog: SHOP TALK: Archiving Performance: the Museum’s Methodologies with a canary torsi

As part of the “Shop Talk: Archiving Performance” conversation series, which considers methods for archiving and documenting performance or other live art at the Museum in consultation with artists, Travis Chamberlain, Associate Curator of Performance and Manager of Public Programs, and Tara Hart, Digital Archivist, conducted a two-part conversation with Yanira Castro, a canary torsi Director and Choreographer, and her collaborator, Installation Designer Kathy Couch. “SHOP TALK: Archiving Performance: the Museum’s Methodologies with a canary torsi” marks the second part of this conversation, in which a canary torsi asks Chamberlain and Hart questions concerning the representation of performance’s liveness through documentation at the Museum, paying particular attention to the way in which records of performance are presented online through organizational structures and taxonomic systems. Questions about the Museum’s responsibility to document performance, and how this can impact forms of audience engagement, are addressed in light of recent public programming.

As residents of last fall’s R&D Season “Performance Archiving Performance” (“PAP”), a canary torsi completed the archive of their project The People to Come: A Participatory Performance Project (“TPtC”; 2012–13) through a live installation and open studio in the New Museum Theater.

Click here to read the first part of this discussion,  “Terms of Submission with a canary torsi.”

Aug 04

Who wore it best?
Kraus Family Curator Gary Carrion-Murayari and our Associate Director and Director of Exhibitions Massimiliano Gioni hard at work installing “Here and Elsewhere.”

Who wore it best?

Kraus Family Curator Gary Carrion-Murayari and our Associate Director and Director of Exhibitions Massimiliano Gioni hard at work installing “Here and Elsewhere.”