New Museum

Oct 19

Last chance to see “Temporary Center for Translation,” closing today at 6 p.m.

Last chance to see “Temporary Center for Translation,” closing today at 6 p.m.

Oct 18

Enjoy the sunny day in our gorgeous Sky Room today.
Photo: Benoit Pailley

Enjoy the sunny day in our gorgeous Sky Room today.

Photo: Benoit Pailley

Oct 17

Less than 2 weeks until “Chris Ofili: Night and Day" opens on October 29.
The exhibition marks the first major US museum exhibition of the artist’s work.
Image: Chris Ofili, Afronirvana, 2002. Oil, acrylic, polyester resin, aluminum foil, glitter, map pins, and elephant dung on canvas,108 × 144 in (274.3 × 365.7 cm). Courtesy the artist, David Zwirner, New York/London, and Victoria Miro, London

Less than 2 weeks until “Chris Ofili: Night and Day" opens on October 29.

The exhibition marks the first major US museum exhibition of the artist’s work.

Image: Chris Ofili, Afronirvana, 2002. Oil, acrylic, polyester resin, aluminum foil, glitter, map pins, and elephant dung on canvas,108 × 144 in (274.3 × 365.7 cm). Courtesy the artist, David Zwirner, New York/London, and Victoria Miro, London

Oct 16

[video]

Oct 15

“Lili Reynaud-Dewar: Live Through That?!" opens today in the Lobby Gallery!
For her first solo museum presentation in the US, Reynaud-Dewar has created a new body of site-specific works: http://bit.ly/1xlrGPo
Image: Lili Reynaud-Dewar, I am intact and I don’t care, 2013. Performance: Frieze Projects, London. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Polly Braden

Lili Reynaud-Dewar: Live Through That?!" opens today in the Lobby Gallery!

For her first solo museum presentation in the US, Reynaud-Dewar has created a new body of site-specific works: http://bit.ly/1xlrGPo

Image: Lili Reynaud-Dewar, I am intact and I don’t care, 2013. Performance: Frieze Projects, London. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Polly Braden

Oct 14

[video]

Oct 11

This is the last weekend to see the last sliver of “Here and Elsewhere”! The Third Floor is closing on Sunday.
Artist Marwan turned to painting to express the intensity of emotion he experienced, in particular, his loneliness, isolation, and longing. In paintings of individuals, such as Das Knie [The Knee] (1967), Kaddouch II (1966), and Mann am Tisch I [Man at the Table I] (1966), body parts are contorted, forms are transfigured, and limbs seem to be pushing outward to escape the body. His works of this period also include depictions of couples, as in Untitled (1969–71), where two figures engage with the gaze of the viewer rather than communicating with each other. Describing his paintings from this period, Marwan explains, “I started using my features as a symbol, as a mirror. My face as a window on my world.” Rather than aiming to create a self-portrait through these works, he depicts the human condition and the joys, fears, and yearnings of the soul.
Photo: Benoit Pailley

This is the last weekend to see the last sliver of “Here and Elsewhere”! The Third Floor is closing on Sunday.

Artist Marwan turned to painting to express the intensity of emotion he experienced, in particular, his loneliness, isolation, and longing. In paintings of individuals, such as Das Knie [The Knee] (1967), Kaddouch II (1966), and Mann am Tisch I [Man at the Table I] (1966), body parts are contorted, forms are transfigured, and limbs seem to be pushing outward to escape the body. His works of this period also include depictions of couples, as in Untitled (1969–71), where two figures engage with the gaze of the viewer rather than communicating with each other. Describing his paintings from this period, Marwan explains, “I started using my features as a symbol, as a mirror. My face as a window on my world.” Rather than aiming to create a self-portrait through these works, he depicts the human condition and the joys, fears, and yearnings of the soul.

Photo: Benoit Pailley

Oct 10

[video]

Oct 09

[video]

Oct 08

There are still a few days to see the Second Floor of “Here and Elsewhere,” closing on Sunday. 
For her long-term video and installation project Objects of War (1999–ongoing), Lamia Joreige conducts interviews in which she asks her subjects to speak about particular personal items that bring back memories of wars in Lebanon. Seen alongside the filmed interviews, the objects that compose Joreige’s installations—a wallet, a Sony Walkman, a teddy bear, a curtain, and a guitar, for instance—evoke intimate and, at times, traumatic anecdotes.
Photo: Benoit Pailley

There are still a few days to see the Second Floor of “Here and Elsewhere,” closing on Sunday. 

For her long-term video and installation project Objects of War (1999–ongoing), Lamia Joreige conducts interviews in which she asks her subjects to speak about particular personal items that bring back memories of wars in Lebanon. Seen alongside the filmed interviews, the objects that compose Joreige’s installations—a wallet, a Sony Walkman, a teddy bear, a curtain, and a guitar, for instance—evoke intimate and, at times, traumatic anecdotes.

Photo: Benoit Pailley

Anna Boghiguian'stwo series of drawings presented as part of “Here and Elsewhere" examine Egyptian culture in the past and present-day. In one series of works exhibited, Boghiguian ponders the venerated bust of the ancient Egyptian queen Nefertiti, ensconced in Berlin, and in another, she probes Cairo’s collective unconscious while training her eye on the violent confrontations and existential anguish that she witnessed throughout Egyptian society in early 2011. In these teeming and unsettling images, many intentionally divested of color, countless hands, mouths, and eyes allude to the desperate and frustrated multitude that instigated and fueled the revolution, while barbed wire, chains, and flames reinscribe the menacing and pervasive emblems of power.
Boghiguigan’s drawings are on view through this Sunday October 12. 

Anna Boghiguian'stwo series of drawings presented as part of “Here and Elsewhere" examine Egyptian culture in the past and present-day. In one series of works exhibited, Boghiguian ponders the venerated bust of the ancient Egyptian queen Nefertiti, ensconced in Berlin, and in another, she probes Cairo’s collective unconscious while training her eye on the violent confrontations and existential anguish that she witnessed throughout Egyptian society in early 2011. In these teeming and unsettling images, many intentionally divested of color, countless hands, mouths, and eyes allude to the desperate and frustrated multitude that instigated and fueled the revolution, while barbed wire, chains, and flames reinscribe the menacing and pervasive emblems of power.

Boghiguigan’s drawings are on view through this Sunday October 12. 

Oct 07

The Second Floor of “Here and Elsewhere" is still on view Wednesday through Friday!
“Fictionville” (2009–ongoing), Rokni Haerizadeh’s recent series of videos and works on paper, borrows its title from the influential 1968 play City of Tales by the Iranian writer Bijan Mofid, which used the structure of folktales to offer strident political and social commentary. Haerizadeh couches his own critique of power in the form of nightmarish fairy tales by painting over printouts of sequential stills from YouTube videos of media broadcasts. 
Photo: Benoit Pailley

The Second Floor of “Here and Elsewhere" is still on view Wednesday through Friday!

“Fictionville” (2009–ongoing), Rokni Haerizadeh’s recent series of videos and works on paper, borrows its title from the influential 1968 play City of Tales by the Iranian writer Bijan Mofid, which used the structure of folktales to offer strident political and social commentary. Haerizadeh couches his own critique of power in the form of nightmarish fairy tales by painting over printouts of sequential stills from YouTube videos of media broadcasts. 

Photo: Benoit Pailley

Oct 06

And the countdown begins! 25 days until our Annual Members-Only Halloween Party on Friday October 31!
Learn about joining to attend here.

And the countdown begins! 25 days until our Annual Members-Only Halloween Party on Friday October 31!

Learn about joining to attend here.

Oct 04

Tomorrow at 4 p.m.: one-time-only performance by Rana Hamadeh in the Theater
On Sunday October 5, Rana Hamadeh will present The Big Board or ‘And Before It Falls, It Is Only Reasonable to Enjoy Life a Little’ (2013), a sculptural cartography activated through Hamadeh’s related performance lecture: http://bit.ly/1r41cw8Reminiscent of a war-room map unfurled on a large table, The Big Board charts connections between the techniques and terms shared by the domains of law and hygiene as represented through archival materials and artifacts. In her performance, Hamadeh dramatizes her evolving treatise on The Big Board‘s themes and subjects to propose a lyrical and constellated method of thinking through established histories and speculative futures.Photo: Performance: 12th Lyon Biennial, France. © Blaise Adilon

Tomorrow at 4 p.m.: one-time-only performance by Rana Hamadeh in the Theater

On Sunday October 5, Rana Hamadeh will present The Big Board or ‘And Before It Falls, It Is Only Reasonable to Enjoy Life a Little’ (2013), a sculptural cartography activated through Hamadeh’s related performance lecture: http://bit.ly/1r41cw8

Reminiscent of a war-room map unfurled on a large table, The Big Board charts connections between the techniques and terms shared by the domains of law and hygiene as represented through archival materials and artifacts. In her performance, Hamadeh dramatizes her evolving treatise on The Big Board‘s themes and subjects to propose a lyrical and constellated method of thinking through established histories and speculative futures.

Photo: Performance: 12th Lyon Biennial, France. © Blaise Adilon

Oct 03

In 2010, Ahmed Mater began a series of visits to Mecca, the historic and sacred center of the Islamic world. In recent years, the city of Mecca has seen tremendous development in an effort to encourage a year-round religious tourism industry that could accommodate an estimated twelve million pilgrims annually. The footage that composes Leaves Fall in All Seasons (2008 to 2013) on view in the Lobby Gallery as part of “Here and Elsewhere" consists of cell-phone recordings that Mater gathered via YouTube as well as directly from the workers he met—many of whom are migrant laborers from South Asia. Editing this material into a series of vignettes that bear witness to the city’s transition, Mater offers a range of perspectives—from playful profiles of coworkers, to labor strikes, to the placement of the iconic golden crescent atop the 1,900-foot-tall Mecca Royal Clock Tower.
This is the last weekend to see Mater’s work in the Lobby Gallery.
Don’t miss a one-time-only performance by artist Rana Hamadeh on Sunday at 4 p.m.
Photo: Benoit Pailley

In 2010, Ahmed Mater began a series of visits to Mecca, the historic and sacred center of the Islamic world. In recent years, the city of Mecca has seen tremendous development in an effort to encourage a year-round religious tourism industry that could accommodate an estimated twelve million pilgrims annually. The footage that composes Leaves Fall in All Seasons (2008 to 2013) on view in the Lobby Gallery as part of “Here and Elsewhere" consists of cell-phone recordings that Mater gathered via YouTube as well as directly from the workers he met—many of whom are migrant laborers from South Asia. Editing this material into a series of vignettes that bear witness to the city’s transition, Mater offers a range of perspectives—from playful profiles of coworkers, to labor strikes, to the placement of the iconic golden crescent atop the 1,900-foot-tall Mecca Royal Clock Tower.

This is the last weekend to see Mater’s work in the Lobby Gallery.

Don’t miss a one-time-only performance by artist Rana Hamadeh on Sunday at 4 p.m.

Photo: Benoit Pailley