New Museum

Jul 29

On opening night of “Here and Elsewhere,” artist Hiwa K presented a performance titled With Jim White Once Upon a Time in the West, a piece that emerged from a friendship and long-term collaboration with Iraq veteran Jim White. The performance, a collaboration with the New School’s jazz and contemporary music department, was a live, ten-minute performance simulating Ennio Morricone’s score for the final duel in Sergio Leone’s spaghetti Western, Once Upon a Time in the West (1968). Hiwa K’s work is also presented as part of “Here and Elsewhere," on view through September 28.
annikaconnor:

Cowboys & Musicians at the #opening night #performance of Once Upon a Time in the West at the @newmuseum by Hiwa K & Jim White. #livenband #cowboys #musicians #museum #contemporaryart #hereandelsewhere (at New Museum)

On opening night of “Here and Elsewhere,” artist Hiwa K presented a performance titled With Jim White Once Upon a Time in the West, a piece that emerged from a friendship and long-term collaboration with Iraq veteran Jim White. The performance, a collaboration with the New School’s jazz and contemporary music department, was a live, ten-minute performance simulating Ennio Morricone’s score for the final duel in Sergio Leone’s spaghetti Western, Once Upon a Time in the West (1968). Hiwa K’s work is also presented as part of “Here and Elsewhere," on view through September 28.

annikaconnor:

Cowboys & Musicians at the #opening night #performance of Once Upon a Time in the West at the @newmuseum by Hiwa K & Jim White. #livenband #cowboys #musicians #museum #contemporaryart #hereandelsewhere (at New Museum)

Jul 25

A pioneering conceptual and performance artist, Suha Traboulsi draws from diverse encounters with language and philosophy, often surveying the boundaries of disciplines as much as the limits of her own body. In the early 1940s, Traboulsi studied art at the Beirut College for Women, but upon finishing her degree, her interests turned from painting toward performance- and language-based conceptual inquiries. 
The works exhibited in “Here and Elsewhere” are from the 1940s, marking Traboulsi’s first departure from conventional methods of painting to more conceptual portraits illustrated using ink or even ballpoint pen on paper. In these works, brightly colored and oddly offset, fragmented shapes appear as if stenciled and digitally manipulated—in line with the minimalist aesthetic soon to prevail internationally, yet uncannily ahead of their time.
Photo: Benoit Pailley

A pioneering conceptual and performance artist, Suha Traboulsi draws from diverse encounters with language and philosophy, often surveying the boundaries of disciplines as much as the limits of her own body. In the early 1940s, Traboulsi studied art at the Beirut College for Women, but upon finishing her degree, her interests turned from painting toward performance- and language-based conceptual inquiries. 

The works exhibited in “Here and Elsewhere” are from the 1940s, marking Traboulsi’s first departure from conventional methods of painting to more conceptual portraits illustrated using ink or even ballpoint pen on paper. In these works, brightly colored and oddly offset, fragmented shapes appear as if stenciled and digitally manipulated—in line with the minimalist aesthetic soon to prevail internationally, yet uncannily ahead of their time.

Photo: Benoit Pailley

Jul 23

Mohamed Larbi Rahali spent two years studying painting at the Art Academy in Tétouan, but his foremost passion has always been the sea. After leaving school, he worked in a range of occupations: as a carpenter, a boat mechanic, and, most frequently, as a fisherman. For Rahali, the return to his artistic practice in 1984 started with a tiny doodle on a discarded matchbox, but marked a major turning point in his life. He began to view matchboxes as miniature sketchbooks that could be salvaged from the sidewalk or collected from café patrons throughout the Tétouan medina.
Omri [My Life] (1984–ongoing) is on view as part of “Here and Elsewhere," an exhibition of contemporary from and about the Arab world on view through September 28.
Photo: Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Mohamed Larbi Rahali spent two years studying painting at the Art Academy in Tétouan, but his foremost passion has always been the sea. After leaving school, he worked in a range of occupations: as a carpenter, a boat mechanic, and, most frequently, as a fisherman. For Rahali, the return to his artistic practice in 1984 started with a tiny doodle on a discarded matchbox, but marked a major turning point in his life. He began to view matchboxes as miniature sketchbooks that could be salvaged from the sidewalk or collected from café patrons throughout the Tétouan medina.

Omri [My Life] (1984–ongoing) is on view as part of “Here and Elsewhere," an exhibition of contemporary from and about the Arab world on view through September 28.

Photo: Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Jul 19

Families chalking at the New Museum Block Party!

Families chalking at the New Museum Block Party!

Jul 16

“Here and Elsewhere" opens today!
On the Fourth Floor, Bouchra Khalili presents “The Mapping Journey Project” (2008–11), in which the artist met the subject of each video through chance encounters in European cities considered transitory points for the movement of people and goods. In each work, Khalili asked the individuals to narrate their journey from their original home to their current location tracing their path in marker on a two-dimensional map.
Photo: Benoit Pailley

Here and Elsewhere" opens today!

On the Fourth Floor, Bouchra Khalili presents “The Mapping Journey Project” (2008–11), in which the artist met the subject of each video through chance encounters in European cities considered transitory points for the movement of people and goods. In each work, Khalili asked the individuals to narrate their journey from their original home to their current location tracing their path in marker on a two-dimensional map.

Photo: Benoit Pailley

Jul 15

The museum-wide exhibition “Here and Elsewhere" opens tomorrow.
An eight-person delegation of artists with common roots in the Gulf region, GCC borrows its name from the abbreviation of Gulf Cooperation Council, an alliance of six oil-exporting nations bordering the Arabian Gulf (Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and Oman). Since its founding, GCC has ironically examined aspects of contemporary Gulf society, often manipulating the decorum and objects that accompany rituals of celebration, or tapping into the lexicon of images, environments, and aesthetic sensibilities that they find emblematic of the region. 
At the New Museum, GCC has transformed the Museum’s Lobby into one characteristic of a luxury Gulf hotel, wallpapering images onto the Lobby’s core elevator wall and facade windows.
Image: Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

The museum-wide exhibition “Here and Elsewhere" opens tomorrow.

An eight-person delegation of artists with common roots in the Gulf region, GCC borrows its name from the abbreviation of Gulf Cooperation Council, an alliance of six oil-exporting nations bordering the Arabian Gulf (Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and Oman). Since its founding, GCC has ironically examined aspects of contemporary Gulf society, often manipulating the decorum and objects that accompany rituals of celebration, or tapping into the lexicon of images, environments, and aesthetic sensibilities that they find emblematic of the region. 

At the New Museum, GCC has transformed the Museum’s Lobby into one characteristic of a luxury Gulf hotel, wallpapering images onto the Lobby’s core elevator wall and facade windows.

Image: Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Jul 14

Opening on Wednesday: “Here and Elsewhere,” a major exhibition of contemporary art from and about the Arab world. 
Learn more here.
Image: Yto Barrada, N du mot Nation en arabe, Tanger (N of the Nation in Arabic, Tangier), 2003. Chromogenic print, 31 1/2 x 31 1/2 in (80 x 80 cm). Courtesy the artist and Sfeir-Semler Gallery, Beirut/Hamburg

Opening on Wednesday: “Here and Elsewhere,” a major exhibition of contemporary art from and about the Arab world. 

Learn more here.

Image: Yto Barrada, N du mot Nation en arabe, Tanger (N of the Nation in Arabic, Tangier), 2003. Chromogenic print, 31 1/2 x 31 1/2 in (80 x 80 cm). Courtesy the artist and Sfeir-Semler Gallery, Beirut/Hamburg

Jul 09

Behind the scenes of the installation of Suspended Objects by Hassan Sharif in the Lobby Gallery as part of “Here and Elsewhere,” our next exhibition opening next Wednesday July 16. The exhibition will present contemporary art from and about the Arab world: http://bit.ly/SG3ub2

Behind the scenes of the installation of Suspended Objects by Hassan Sharif in the Lobby Gallery as part of “Here and Elsewhere,” our next exhibition opening next Wednesday July 16. The exhibition will present contemporary art from and about the Arab world: http://bit.ly/SG3ub2

Jul 06

patternisland:

Original pic of @newmuseum (hope you don’t mind) #everythingmakespatterns #muchodeto #patternisland

patternisland:

Original pic of @newmuseum (hope you don’t mind) #everythingmakespatterns #muchodeto #patternisland

Jul 05

View these head gear costumes along with the rest of the exhibition on the Fifth Floor—“Jeanine Oleson: Hear, Here" closes this Sunday, July 6!
kimcharleskay:

#Sneakpeek #opera #jeanineoleson @newmuseum #headgear #costumes

View these head gear costumes along with the rest of the exhibition on the Fifth Floor—Jeanine Oleson: Hear, Here" closes this Sunday, July 6!

kimcharleskay:

#Sneakpeek #opera #jeanineoleson @newmuseum #headgear #costumes

Jul 03

[video]

Having recently performed as part of a series of gallery sessions on voice in conjunction with Jeanine Oleson’s on view exhibition "Hear, Here," Askew will be performing again at the New Museum’s Block Party on July 17, 2014. Askew’s melodic piano-based tunes showcase her talents as a versatile singer-songwriter (and dedicated animal rights activist) and are marked by a distinct vocal style that gently shifts between ethereal high notes and a more stripped-down bluesy sincerity.
newmuseumrdseasons:

Joy Askew: Songs for Animals
At 3pm on Friday, May 9, Joy Askew will present "Songs for Animals" as part of a series of gallery sessions on voice in conjunction with Jeanine Oleson’s exhibition Hear, Here at the New Museum.
Using voice loops, collected samples, projections, poetry and prose from various sources, Askew will be a ‘voice for the voiceless’ and present a look at our relationships with animals, captive and free.
Singer-songwriter Joy Askew has played and sung in bands with such luminary artists as Joe Jackson, Peter Gabriel, Laurie Anderson, and Jack Bruce, and in 1986, Askew appeared in Laurie Anderson’s quintessential movie Home Of The Brave. Askew is also a member of the band Forge the Bell—a soundscape full of loops and improvisation. Askew has been an activist on behalf of farmed animals since 2004.

Having recently performed as part of a series of gallery sessions on voice in conjunction with Jeanine Oleson’s on view exhibition "Hear, Here," Askew will be performing again at the New Museum’s Block Party on July 17, 2014. Askew’s melodic piano-based tunes showcase her talents as a versatile singer-songwriter (and dedicated animal rights activist) and are marked by a distinct vocal style that gently shifts between ethereal high notes and a more stripped-down bluesy sincerity.

newmuseumrdseasons:

Joy Askew: Songs for Animals

At 3pm on Friday, May 9, Joy Askew will present "Songs for Animals" as part of a series of gallery sessions on voice in conjunction with Jeanine Oleson’s exhibition Hear, Here at the New Museum.

Using voice loops, collected samples, projections, poetry and prose from various sources, Askew will be a ‘voice for the voiceless’ and present a look at our relationships with animals, captive and free.

Singer-songwriter Joy Askew has played and sung in bands with such luminary artists as Joe Jackson, Peter Gabriel, Laurie Anderson, and Jack Bruce, and in 1986, Askew appeared in Laurie Anderson’s quintessential movie Home Of The Brave. Askew is also a member of the band Forge the Bell—a soundscape full of loops and improvisation. Askew has been an activist on behalf of farmed animals since 2004.

Jul 01

“Jeanine Oleson: Hear, Here" is open through this Sunday, July 6.
newmuseumrdseasons:

Jeanine Oleson, one of two resident artists for the VOICE Season, incorporates interdisciplinary uses of photography, performance, film/video, and installation work. Challenging political and social norms through works that bear a distinctive mix of pathos and wit, Oleson engages contemporary societal topics. These include the collective psyche of apocalyptic anxiety, the global ecological crisis, the persistence of spiritual rituals, and alternative methods of addressing the myriad inequities produced by homophobia, racism, and classism.
During her intensive residency at the New Museum, she will develop a group of interrelated new works, constituting an exhibition, public programs, workshops, a publication, and an experimental opera. An exploration of different kinds of voices—from the musical voice of opera to political acts of speech—Oleson’s project both investigates language and points beyond it.
Image: Jeanine Oleson in OMG (Oh, Magog!), October 22, 2011, Performance at Silvershed, New York, NY organized by IN THE ACT Högkvarteret (Sweden). Photo credit: David Kelley.

Jeanine Oleson: Hear, Here" is open through this Sunday, July 6.

newmuseumrdseasons:

Jeanine Oleson, one of two resident artists for the VOICE Season, incorporates interdisciplinary uses of photography, performance, film/video, and installation work. Challenging political and social norms through works that bear a distinctive mix of pathos and wit, Oleson engages contemporary societal topics. These include the collective psyche of apocalyptic anxiety, the global ecological crisis, the persistence of spiritual rituals, and alternative methods of addressing the myriad inequities produced by homophobia, racism, and classism.

During her intensive residency at the New Museum, she will develop a group of interrelated new works, constituting an exhibition, public programs, workshops, a publication, and an experimental opera. An exploration of different kinds of voices—from the musical voice of opera to political acts of speech—Oleson’s project both investigates language and points beyond it.

Image: Jeanine Oleson in OMG (Oh, Magog!), October 22, 2011, Performance at Silvershed, New York, NY organized by IN THE ACT Högkvarteret (Sweden). Photo credit: David Kelley.

Jun 30

[video]

Jun 29

Today is the last day to see “Roberto Cuoghi: Šuillakku Corral”! Cuoghi researched, built, and played a collection of handmade instruments for Šuillakku – corral version (2008–14), his immersive sound installation which evokes 
Image: Documentary photography during the preparation of Šuillakku, 2008. Courtesy the artist and Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London

Today is the last day to see “Roberto Cuoghi: Šuillakku Corral”! Cuoghi researched, built, and played a collection of handmade instruments for Šuillakku – corral version (2008–14), his immersive sound installation which evokes 

Image: Documentary photography during the preparation of Šuillakku, 2008. Courtesy the artist and Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London