New Museum

Apr 22

Tomorrow through Sunday April 27 during open Museum hours, we will be dividing and distributing pieces of Paweł Althamer’s Draftsmen’s Congress to visitors for free with Museum admission! More info here.
Click here to view a timelapse of the space changing over the course of the exhibition.

Tomorrow through Sunday April 27 during open Museum hours, we will be dividing and distributing pieces of Paweł Althamer’s Draftsmen’s Congress to visitors for free with Museum admission! More info here.

Click here to view a timelapse of the space changing over the course of the exhibition.

Apr 20

Today is the last day to view the sculpture exhibition at 231 Bowery with works by Paweł Althamer, collaborators from Poland and Mali, and a group of residents from The Bowery Mission. 
Take home a piece of “The Neighbors”! Wednesday April 23 through Sunday April 27, we will be disassembling the collective public artwork which thousands of Museum visitors have contributed to, and distributing pieces to visitors for free. Click here for more info.

Today is the last day to view the sculpture exhibition at 231 Bowery with works by Paweł Althamer, collaborators from Poland and Mali, and a group of residents from The Bowery Mission. 

Take home a piece of “The Neighbors”! Wednesday April 23 through Sunday April 27, we will be disassembling the collective public artwork which thousands of Museum visitors have contributed to, and distributing pieces to visitors for free. Click here for more info.

Apr 19

On view through tomorrow! Paweł Althamer’s exhibition of new sculptures at 231 Bowery—made while in residence at the New Museum with collaborators from Poland, Mali, and residents of the Bowery Mission, among others—will be extended through this Sunday April 20. The exhibition is free with Museum admission.
This is the last weekend to make your mark on Draftsmen’s Congress! This upcoming Wednesday–Sunday, we will be disassembling the collective public artwork which thousands of Museum visitors have contributed to, and distributing pieces to visitors for free. Click here for more info.

On view through tomorrow! Paweł Althamer’s exhibition of new sculptures at 231 Bowery—made while in residence at the New Museum with collaborators from Poland, Mali, and residents of the Bowery Mission, among others—will be extended through this Sunday April 20. The exhibition is free with Museum admission.

This is the last weekend to make your mark on Draftsmen’s Congress! This upcoming Wednesday–Sunday, we will be disassembling the collective public artwork which thousands of Museum visitors have contributed to, and distributing pieces to visitors for free. Click here for more info.

Today from 1 p.m.–7 p.m.: On Saturday April 19, the New Museum will hold a one-day symposium on exhibitions organized by artists, with a particular focus on the exhibition as material, rather than a collection of disparate objects. We will consider a variety of structural mechanisms used by artists to render and organize space, time, and agents in experimental ways, examining occasions where the unique substance of an exhibition has been engaged to allow for an innovative working-through of ideas. Participants include Jan Verwoert, Stephen Prina, Monika Szewczyk, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Kevin Lotery, Juli Carson, and Alex Kitnick. Tickets available here.
Image: Noah Purifoy, “66 Signs of Neon,” ca. 1966. Exhibition view. Image: Courtesy the Noah Purifoy Foundation noahpurifoy.com

Today from 1 p.m.–7 p.m.: On Saturday April 19, the New Museum will hold a one-day symposium on exhibitions organized by artists, with a particular focus on the exhibition as material, rather than a collection of disparate objects. We will consider a variety of structural mechanisms used by artists to render and organize space, time, and agents in experimental ways, examining occasions where the unique substance of an exhibition has been engaged to allow for an innovative working-through of ideas. Participants include Jan Verwoert, Stephen Prina, Monika Szewczyk, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Kevin Lotery, Juli Carson, and Alex Kitnick. Tickets available here.

Image: Noah Purifoy, “66 Signs of Neon,” ca. 1966. Exhibition view. Image: Courtesy the Noah Purifoy Foundation noahpurifoy.com

Apr 18

Paweł Althamer’s exhibition of new sculptures at 231 Bowery—made while in residence at the New Museum with collaborators from Poland, Mali, and residents of the Bowery Mission, among others—will be extended through this Sunday April 20!The exhibition is free with Museum admission.

Paweł Althamer’s exhibition of new sculptures at 231 Bowery—made while in residence at the New Museum with collaborators from Poland, Mali, and residents of the Bowery Mission, among others—will be extended through this Sunday April 20!The exhibition is free with Museum admission.

Apr 17

Today only through 9 p.m.: one-day sculpture exhibition by Paweł Althamer in collaboration with a group of residents from The Bowery Mission as well as from Poland and Mali. Free and open to the public at 231 Bowery!
Also, tonight is the last pay-as-you-wish night to make your mark in Draftsmen’s Congress as part of “Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors.”

Today only through 9 p.m.: one-day sculpture exhibition by Paweł Althamer in collaboration with a group of residents from The Bowery Mission as well as from Poland and Mali. Free and open to the public at 231 Bowery!

Also, tonight is the last pay-as-you-wish night to make your mark in Draftsmen’s Congress as part of Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors.”

Apr 16

TOMORROW: One-day exhibition of sculptures by Paweł Althamer, residents of The Bowery Mission, and collaborators from Poland and Mali at 231 Bowery from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
Free and open to the public!

TOMORROW: One-day exhibition of sculptures by Paweł Althamer, residents of The Bowery Mission, and collaborators from Poland and Mali at 231 Bowery from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Free and open to the public!

Apr 15

Since the opening of “The Neighbors” in February, Paweł Althamer has worked in partnership with a range of artists, friends, and collaborators to create sixteen new sculptures. During this period, Althamer also ran sculpture and film workshops with a group of residents from The Bowery Mission. Together, they will present a one-day exhibition of the new works on Thursday April 17, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., in the New Museum’s storefront space at 231 Bowery. The exhibition will be free and open to the public: http://bit.ly/1hfHejs

Since the opening of “The Neighbors” in February, Paweł Althamer has worked in partnership with a range of artists, friends, and collaborators to create sixteen new sculptures. During this period, Althamer also ran sculpture and film workshops with a group of residents from The Bowery Mission. Together, they will present a one-day exhibition of the new works on Thursday April 17, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., in the New Museum’s storefront space at 231 Bowery. The exhibition will be free and open to the publichttp://bit.ly/1hfHejs

Apr 14

[video]

As part of “The Neighbors," Paweł Althamer has arranged for street musicians to play in front of or inside the New Museum—the live music will be broadcasted to the Third Floor gallery of the Museum. Throughout the exhibition, we will be posting interviews of the participating musicians to share their unique stories and diverse career paths.
Name: Robert Leslie
New Museum: Where do you normally play in New York?
Robert Leslie: I usually play in the subway and at venues in the Lower East Side and Brooklyn.
NM: How would you describe your sound?
RL: It’s folk singer/songwriter stuff.
NM: Does performing in the street influence your music or the way you interact with audiences?

RL: It makes you cheekier. And, it also makes you more aggressive in trying to get your audiences’ attention. 

As part of “The Neighbors," Paweł Althamer has arranged for street musicians to play in front of or inside the New Museum—the live music will be broadcasted to the Third Floor gallery of the Museum. Throughout the exhibition, we will be posting interviews of the participating musicians to share their unique stories and diverse career paths.

Name: Robert Leslie

New Museum: Where do you normally play in New York?

Robert Leslie: I usually play in the subway and at venues in the Lower East Side and Brooklyn.

NM: How would you describe your sound?

RL: It’s folk singer/songwriter stuff.

NM: Does performing in the street influence your music or the way you interact with audiences?

RL: It makes you cheekier. And, it also makes you more aggressive in trying to get your audiences’ attention. 

Apr 10

TBT: “After Nature," (2008) which included works by Paweł Althamer, surveyed a landscape of wilderness and ruins, darkened by uncertain catastrophe.
This is the last week to see the Third Floor of “Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors”! We are open tonight until 9 p.m., pay-as-you-wish from 7–9 p.m.
Photo: Benoit Pailley

TBT: “After Nature," (2008) which included works by Paweł Althamer, surveyed a landscape of wilderness and ruins, darkened by uncertain catastrophe.

This is the last week to see the Third Floor of “Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors”! We are open tonight until 9 p.m., pay-as-you-wish from 7–9 p.m.

Photo: Benoit Pailley

Apr 09

In advance of their workshop in late April, Six Degrees invited critic and art historian Media Farzin to speak with the Back Room Codirectors Ava Ansari and Molly Kleiman about the urgencies that motivated their project’s formation in 2010 and the questions that have shaped its evolution since. Read the conversation here.
Six Degrees, as an editorial platform that feeds into and out of New Museum programming by functioning as a space for expanded dialogue, research, and reflection, will be inviting different artistic, curatorial, and educational initiatives to consider their own structures and material conditions for production.

In advance of their workshop in late April, Six Degrees invited critic and art historian Media Farzin to speak with the Back Room Codirectors Ava Ansari and Molly Kleiman about the urgencies that motivated their project’s formation in 2010 and the questions that have shaped its evolution since. Read the conversation here.

Six Degreesas an editorial platform that feeds into and out of New Museum programming by functioning as a space for expanded dialogue, research, and reflection, will be inviting different artistic, curatorial, and educational initiatives to consider their own structures and material conditions for production.

Apr 08

[video]

Apr 07

As part of “The Neighbors," Paweł Althamer has arranged for street musicians to play in front of or inside the New Museum—the live music will be broadcasted to the Third Floor gallery of the Museum. Throughout the exhibition, we will be posting interviews of the participating musicians to share their unique stories and diverse career paths.
Name: Theo Eastwind
New Museum: Where do you normally play in New York?
Theo Eastwind: In the subway mostly: Bedford Avenue and Lorimer Street subway stops, and also the Busker Ball in Spike Hill, Brooklyn. I organize the Busker Ball where I get all the best buskers—not just in the country but also internationally. It happens every three months and the sixth one will be on April 24. It’s free for them to perform. They get free drinks and all of the money that’s made at the door goes directly back to the musicians. It’s geared toward charity.
American Songwriter Magazine named me king of the underground. I’ve got to be bold and claim it.
NM: How would you describe your sound?
TE: It’s unique. Somber, yet rocking. Alternative somber rock. Somber alternative rock—SAR!  I am a king and a SAR! My music comes from Jeff Buckley. I knew him and we played together. His band played with me on my third album. I’m influenced by Nick Drake, Sting, and Nirvana as well. Also Johnny Cash because we are both very simple and to the point. I’ve been busking since 1995. I grew old doing this and continue to grow old doing this.
NM: Does performing in the street influence your music or the way you interact with audiences?

TE: Most definitely! What’s great about performing in the subway is that there are a lot of people there with a lot of different brains. The brain sends out these waves that people can pick up and respond. I’m influenced by the brains—all these brains! I write material spontaneously, like a comedian improvising. Between 3:27 a.m. and 5:27 a.m., people are sleeping. When people sleep, their brains emit all of these creative waves. I write lyrics at night when people sleep so I have all of this creative influence. Music is for people’s ears so I make music for people but I play for myself, too. When I write a song, I’m so excited to go to the subway. When I go brain sourcing in the subway, there is a trial and error process with each song.

As part of “The Neighbors," Paweł Althamer has arranged for street musicians to play in front of or inside the New Museum—the live music will be broadcasted to the Third Floor gallery of the Museum. Throughout the exhibition, we will be posting interviews of the participating musicians to share their unique stories and diverse career paths.

Name: Theo Eastwind

New Museum: Where do you normally play in New York?

Theo Eastwind: In the subway mostly: Bedford Avenue and Lorimer Street subway stops, and also the Busker Ball in Spike Hill, Brooklyn. I organize the Busker Ball where I get all the best buskers—not just in the country but also internationally. It happens every three months and the sixth one will be on April 24. It’s free for them to perform. They get free drinks and all of the money that’s made at the door goes directly back to the musicians. It’s geared toward charity.

American Songwriter Magazine named me king of the underground. I’ve got to be bold and claim it.

NM: How would you describe your sound?

TE: It’s unique. Somber, yet rocking. Alternative somber rock. Somber alternative rock—SAR!  I am a king and a SAR! My music comes from Jeff Buckley. I knew him and we played together. His band played with me on my third album. I’m influenced by Nick Drake, Sting, and Nirvana as well. Also Johnny Cash because we are both very simple and to the point. I’ve been busking since 1995. I grew old doing this and continue to grow old doing this.

NM: Does performing in the street influence your music or the way you interact with audiences?

TE: Most definitely! What’s great about performing in the subway is that there are a lot of people there with a lot of different brains. The brain sends out these waves that people can pick up and respond. I’m influenced by the brains—all these brains! I write material spontaneously, like a comedian improvising. Between 3:27 a.m. and 5:27 a.m., people are sleeping. When people sleep, their brains emit all of these creative waves. I write lyrics at night when people sleep so I have all of this creative influence. Music is for people’s ears so I make music for people but I play for myself, too. When I write a song, I’m so excited to go to the subway. When I go brain sourcing in the subway, there is a trial and error process with each song.

Apr 06

archdaily:

#SANAA and a boat, the @NewMuseum 🗽 #architecture #archdaily #instagood #newyork #iphonesia #pritzkerprize (at New Museum)

archdaily:

#SANAA and a boat, the @NewMuseum 🗽 #architecture #archdaily #instagood #newyork #iphonesia #pritzkerprize (at New Museum)